About your Search

20090801
20090831
SHOW
( more )
STATION
CNN 30
CSPAN 29
MSNBC 25
CSPAN2 23
HLN 23
FOXNEWS 22
WBAL (NBC) 15
WRC (NBC) 15
CNBC 8
WTTG 8
WMAR (ABC) 7
WJZ (CBS) 6
WUSA (CBS) 4
WBFF (FOX) 3
WJLA (ABC) 2
WMPT (PBS) 1
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 221
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 221 (some duplicates have been removed)
, and remember, you question with boldness! come on, follow me. hello, america. we have some more questions for you tonight. i believe, just so you know going in that this is probably the most controversial show of the week, because you must understand the last three episodes of this show to be able to see and come to a place where you can believe that these crazy things may actually be happening. i want you to know, i hope these things are not happening. i hope that there is some other explanation, but i needed you to see who is advising the president earlier this week and what they are doing and who they are before i could ask you to look at this phrase from barack obama and think that the president of the united states literally means this. >> we cannot continue to rely only on our military in order to achieve the national security objectives that we set. we've got to have a civilian national security force that's just as powerful, just as strong, just as well funded. glenn: i mean, i don't know how anybody is going to respond to the facts that i'm going to present tonight, because quite
of a better america immersed from woodstock. he writes woodstock means little until you place it in the larger context of the society unravelling around the young adults. from their parents generation, they had absorbed rich idealism for social and economic justice. the piece by brett green and author in denver goes on to say, it was an interlude arriving in the context of more social and political upheaval than most americans have witnessed. it was a chaotic but peaceful interlude to a forthcoming breakdown between government and the governed when combined, it would end an unpopular war. i want to talk for the first half-hour, your thoughts, did a better america emerge from woodstock. the numbers ... twitter address is cspanwj. if you have called us in the last 30 days, send your comment via e-mail or twitter and give others a chance. >> what was it about the gathering, this carnival, this music festival that influenced your political evolution and did a better america emerge from woodstock? more from the denver post piece, a better america emerged from wood stot by brett green. he wrote it w
aspires which is the history of the kgb in america. i don't think he fabricat the homo book you should be careful because in the same way i was careful whether or not i.f. stone hitchhiked to massachusetts so you do have some files that say he had conversations with some when he may or may not have known was the kgb agent. you can say that with confidence that there may be these documents which may say yes, we do not know that because we cannot say them so let's assume that they do. what do we know? 1936 i.f. stone had conversations with somebody who was a reporter working for the soviet wire service in america. he may or may not have known was a kgb agent and may or may not have been friendly or helpful. in 1936 he was a enthusiastic fellow traveler and very enthusiastic of the american communist party and premise supportive of tough soviet union in so far was the only country that supplied arms to the anish republic. also he was terrified of the threat of fascism. in 1937 i.f. stone of became his name because he was terrified fascism might come to america and his family was targeted.
. it was fought to make america be america for all its citizens. these were america's civil rights leaders. >> host: how would you describe this period in the 1950's to the young african-americans who only read about it through history books? and we should point out the year you were born, 1954. >> guest: exactly. what was interesting to me is i went on a book tour for "eyes on the prize" realizing how many people hadn't lived through this year, and this was of course than the late 80's and early 90's. so today it is overwhelming. most americans today, a quarter of the population are under 18. they have no concept. with a new is martin luther king is a hero or to be viewed as a hero, viewed positively although we get some younger people who think that he's just an image, they want a more militant figure. like malcolm x that would stand up, sort of the defiant black lace. then you get people who don't understand. they -- something like a colored blanking fountain, just bizarre or you get white kids who don't understand how recent so many of these indignities and limits in terms of education
of the difficulty of psychology of being black in america, he was the first person obviously to be on the court and understood right away that as he went through confirmation hearings and then just gone through confirmation hearings with briefing by to clarence thomas hearings and you think minorities and women very difficult and thurgood marshall's last three months and his intellect was question talked about was the smart to really be among the nation's legal elite and said there in judgment as a member of the court and when he gets on the court he really thought i must get the very best in terms of law clerks and assistance and what if the both of the idea that he could, in fact, handle this work and respond to the reasons assumptions. >> host: you also a great deal held this theory about how he was elected and also his conversations with lyndon johnson and doubt as to whether he felt it was clear to pick up the phone and call him. >> guest: i use that as the start of a book because in terms of building the narrative his experience in that moment tells you so much about the securities issues
. for america, he was the defender of a dream. >> ted kennedy was in fact the last surviving son of a political legacy, a legend in american politics. and a man some call one of the great senators of our time. good evening. i'm jim vance. >> i'm windy rieger in for doreen. the nation mourns the death of senator kennedy. michelle franzen starts us off. >> reporter: a lone spotlight illuminated by a hazard ship in hyannisport, a beacon of hope off the shore of the kennedy family compound. inside family and friends including senator john kerry gather to mourn and reflect on the great life lost. >> there is a very beautiful and personal, private, vigil taking place. it's very spiritual and -- about as -- beautiful as it could be. i think it is everything that senator ken tnedy would have wanted. private and public tributes. kennedy would have loved. [ "taps" plays ] at at fenway park, taps played in his honor. and flags flew at half staff, near his home to capitol hill. >> the liberal lion's mighty roar. i'll always remember. may now fall silent. his dreams shall never die. >> those who knew kenned
.p. morgan doing 20% of their mortgages. down towards the bottom, you have bank of america and wells fargo at 4% and 6%. host: let's put the basics backs on the table. it is called what? guest: under the umbrella of making home affordable, at the peace we are focusing on is the home affordable modification program. it is what buyers do if they are running into problems. they call their letter and say they want a hempo modifications . the servicer will figure out how much you can pay. the point is to get your monthly payments down to 31% of your income. host: how much money was set aside for this and how was it used? guest: they set aside a certain amount. there are several pieces to this. there is an incentive payment for each loan that gets modified that is successful. then there are annual payments of $1,000 as long as the lone state's current. the bar were actually gets money towards their payments going to pay down their principal. -- the bowerer actually gets money towards their payments. the servicer will reduce their payment to 38% and the government will split the difference with t
need health care in america. one of the people who really got the people have asked me, what was it like? i tell people that barack obama, the most thing that i will say is driving him is that he watched his white mother died because of inefficiency in health care in america. i think that is the number one driving force, that he does not want to see that happen to americans, white and black, across the board. and he is going to fight with everything he has got because he watched it. he does not have his mother anymore, he does not have his father anymore, and i think he wants people like me who get laid off, 10,000 of us, and know that we need health care in america. thank god for people like sharon brower, the senator who is working hard -- like sherrod brown, the senator who is working hard on behalf of the american people. i worked 45 years of my life and got laid off. people have no idea what it is like to be laid off in america if you have never been laid off. we need this, and i thank god for barack obama, sherrod brown, in the people who are fighting for our rights to
, but not this time. >>> and he's america's money man. and president obama wants to keep him on the job. mr. obama revealed this morning that he'll nominate federal reserve chair, ben bernanke, nor for a second term, that announcement from martha's vineyard, where the family is vacations came through. he said bernanke has led the u.s. through the worst economic crisis that we've ever faced. he'll have to be confirmed by senate where some lawmakers might not be too happy with his first term. >>> promising news on the housing front, and it's about time. a closely watched index shows home prices have posted their first quarterly increase in 3 years. it was nearly a 3% jump from the first quarter but still down 15% from the second quarter of last year. home prices are now at home levels not seen since early 2003. >>> there's a lot of optimism about the economy in asia, but how about new york? cnn's richard quest joins us once again, but this time not from the front of the new york stock exchange, he's in brooklyn. what have you found there besides the waterfront, my friend? >> reporter: i've joined th
yesterday with apologies to those folks watching on c-span, but the only moral contented people in america then left-wing commager's on blogs or left wing collars -- are left wing coallers on washington journal. three weeks ago, nancy pelosi was blocking legislation would prohibit the fairness doctrine. who is the lead role in the senate, not barbara boxer, the other one feinstein did mention it. they're blocking republican attempts to shut it down while pointing people t the fcc to throw it back in. we have to be vigilant >> thank you, i live in a snake pit called new jersey have the time. part of the problem is that in new jersey, we have three republican congressmen that voted for capt. trade. i, being a lifelong republican and conservative feel like it is time to pull the plug on these people. [applause] if they're going to be supporting barack obama and the democrats, we do not need them. but when i talk to other republican people, they say that if we get rid of one, we will get another one so that i am in a dilemma about that. we have a man that is running for governor who, one week
is now president of the united states of america. [applause] our senators taking over from republicans. [applause] our good friend donna edwards has banned elected to her first full term in the house of representatives with many, many more to come. [applause] i have to tell you as someone who works with netroots nation every year, we had to be ready for the alternative. we had to have our other agenda in place in case the other actions turned out otherwise. some of the panel's we had in place. "no, we didn't." food policy and the mccain era. advocating the canadian immigration process. [laughter] taking your message to the people, billboards and skywriting changed elections. rob emanuel. meet the supreme court's first supreme court justice, alberto gonzales. reforming the vice-presidential selection process, how to find the village with the biggest idiot. [laughter] [applause] on behalf of our board, i can't say enough about our tremendous staff that works year-round to put this conference together. raven brooks, karen colbern, we would not be here without you. [applause] we would not
home training. immigration reform? this question came via e-mail at america's voice. during 2008, latino voters played and historic role turning four stage from red to blue. it's a defining issue for latino voters and president obama campaigned on a promise for this. how is he going to get comprehensive immigration reform done now. we've seen the dates flip a bit. what's doing on? >> what the president said throughout the campaign and in office is we have to have comprehensive immigration reform. my top person who is head of international governmental affairs, the question she asked before joining the administration is, is the president committed this and he absolutely is and he's pulled together members of congress, those who are supported of immigration reform and those who are not, brought them together in the white house and began to dialogue. we have someone working hard on the hill to see what measures we can do in the short-term but the real solution is long-term immigration reform. you mentioned the date has slipped. obviously there's a full plate but i think the preside
it as part of cspan's america and the courts saturday at 7:00, eastern. >> three days of peace, love, and music. 40 years ago this weekend, half a million people gathered for woodstock. saturday, the co-founder will take us behind the scenes. that will be at 9:00 p.m., eastern, on both tv. >> how is cspan funded? >> donations? >> federal funds, grant funds? >> maybe contributions. >> austin, i don't know. >> i would say from commercials. >> advertising? >> something from the government? >> 30 years ago, america pause cable companies created cspan as a public service. it is a private business initiative with no government mandate, no government money. >> while we wait for live coverage of the netroots convention in less than one hour, conversation with one of the conservative bloggers meeting in pittsburgh this weekend from this morning's " washington journal per-ql." host: tell us what you are representing. guest: i am here to talk about conservative activism on line and become larger participants. people across the country can act with one voice. host: we have been checking with rep
of clean energy. the department of the interior manages 20% of america. these lands that only include some of our treasured landscapes, but also some of the most productive energy areas. until recently, energy production of focus has been on conventional resources including oil, gas, and coal. insuring these resources is essential to our energy security, but we also have undeveloped potential on our public lands and under the leadership of president obama and secretary salazar, we are pursuing these opportunities. the bureau of land management has identified over 20 million acres of public land with energy potential and over 29 million acres with solar energy potential. there are also 140 million acres of public land in alaska with a geothermal resource potential as well as significant biomass potential. these public lands have the potential to produce a total of 2.9 megawatts of solar. 206 megawatts of wind. 39,000 megawatts of geothermal energy. there is also significant potential in our offshore waters. the department of energy, the national laboratory has identified more than 1000 giga
: president obama responded it is true. you cannot cover all the uninsured in america for three. he reiterated its promise to completely avoid raising taxes on those who earn less than 1/4 of a million dollars per year. the president has an answer. >> 2/3 of the money we can obtain just by eliminating waste and inefficiencies. the congressional budget office agreed with that, which is not something i am making up. republicans do not dispute it. the other 1/3 we would have to find additional revenue, but it would not come on the backs of the middle-class. shepard: the president said he appreciated the question and "the respectful way in which the man asked it." a nod to the reality that the meetings have become difficult at times. major garrett, there has been talk that things might get a little more rowdy. >> the audience here was first- come, first-served, unlike in new hampshire, which was by lottery. some people slept out overnight to make sure they got into the auditorium. the town is just outside of a big city in montana. the state has been trending democratic of late. the questions the p
in america. so i would actually make this more small business-friendly than even the blue dogs did. if it was up to me, i'd say anybody with a payroll of less than million dollars or anybody with a number of employees less than 50 is exempt from the mandate. now we're going to take the flier. i see i only have a few minutes left. i'm just -- i have -- since i wrote about this in the book, i feel some -- i think it's okay for me to say this. i'm not pushing this. but it was part of my platform in 2004. [laughter] >> it's slightly revised. [applause] >> if i were going to do this, i actually argue in the book that we really don't need a mandate and i don't think mandates are going to be very popular. because mandating anything with the american people is never very popular which is why it makes me mad while the republicans think about sticking us with the mandates that we have today. [applause] >> but if i could do this any way i wanted to, this is a flier, i'm not lobbying for this. all i care about is the public option. i would give everybody under 25 or 30 medicaid for free. and i
and fear including this one from the supposed leader of the ohio militia. >> america, it's your wake-up call. >> i think that the president has in effect triggered fears among a fairly large number of white people in this country that they are somehow losing their country. >> reporter: officials tell my colleague pierre thomas at abc news that the president's daily threat matrix has yet to reflect a sharp increase inthreats. but white house officials privately admit deep concern and have told the secret service to keep security tight even if the president himself objects. bill and robin? >> all right, brian. so i bet there's going to be tight security and some very tough questions when president obama heads to montana later today holding the second of three town halls this week to sell and defend his health care reform plan. the president getting support from former president bill clinton, who came to his defense on thursday saying republicans are promoting fear in the health care fight. >>> senior white house correspondent jake tapper has more for us this morning. good morning, jake
there with the cameras, so america will see the rally. from new york, good night, america. [captioning made possible by fox news channel] captioned by the national captioning institute ---www.ncicap.org--- chris: next on "special report, how did the white house get hundreds of e-mail addresses from people who had no interest in getting contacted. the president goes west to preach his gospel of healthcare reform. is the recession over, or are better economic numbers just a mirage? and out of the doghouse, a pro football star begins a controversial comeback in the city of brotherly love. all that, plus the fox all-stars and the fright friday lightning round. "special report" starts now. welcome to washington. i'm chris wallace in for bret baier. we begin tonight with more on the issue of privacy, and how the white house obtained e-mail addresses for hundreds of people who never gave them to the administration to get information on healthcare reform. senior white house correspondent major garrett tried to he get some answers thursday from the president's chief spokesman. he h
in places of america that are named after kosciuszko. and those of you that thought this would be a discussion about kosciuszko mustard that takes place at your local deli every day. [laughter] know, this is about thaddeus kosciuszko, the peasant prints in the age of revelation. kosciuszko was a prince of tolerance to stop for the disenfranchisement of all religions and genders he was probably the greatest humanitarian of his era. in 1817 when the news of his death and exile in switzerland spread through europe funeral masses were held in catholic, lutheran and calvinist churches. even the jewish temples and muslim mosques helped services where the worshipers prayed for god to take kosciuszko's sold to heaven. think about it, europe have gone through decades ethnic and religious strife see it everybody paid for his soul. .. kosciuszko's birth was augustus and he was elected thanks to the love of his lover, catherine the great of russia. russia started to have more and more of an impact on polish society at this time so a lot of poles were trying to figure out ways to help drive
and happiness belongs to america. that if i am a woman from it all i do not like choice. i enjoy being a muslim woman does not pursue happiness and these were also issues that i responded to when i was writing. >> host: in one of the reviews of the book, they made the argument that perhaps your mother ayyad delusion about herself, about the life she created, the illusion that you got sucked into it in many different ways and became a part of it is a metaphor for the illusion of iran, a country that has an image of itself and what it wishes to be and thinks it is deserving to be bought is constantly underperforming. is that what you had in mind? >> guest: i knew that in writing this book i was also responding to different feelings and emotions about iran about the concept what home is or was. but people who read the book always had insight that you necessarily did not have. i do think that we have an illusion of the past and if like my mother we become frozen and do not have a critical and dynamic conversation with the past we will never leave that past. we can change regimes every ten years and
that united america. after sputnik, we went to pick the moon. ronald reagan rally in the country to end communism. you can think of george bush's cry in 2001 that we would defeat -- lead a global war on terrorism and extremism. it is interesting, the last one, the war on terrorism seems to have lost some of that national feeling. when you do polling, you see people not as invested in the success of afghanistan and iraq and other places where we are fighting were secretly, such as the horn of africa. yet in our strategic interest, clearly fighting terrorism will remain the big issue. he what is the next big national issue? what can president obama defined as the national agenda? he tried very much to make health care that. in the last press conference he said it is intimately tied to your own personal future as an american. but we have not seen americans rally around that idea yet as a national cause. this is something president obama and his allies will try to do. he will try to cast the health care debate as important as going to the moon or defeating communism or terrorism you will se
america never die. i love you, dad. and you will always live in my heart forever. [applause] [applause] >> your eminence, vicki, cara, edward, patrick, currin, caroline, members of the kennedy family, distinguished guests, and fellow citizens,. todacitizens, today we say goodbye to the youngest child of rose and joseph kenne kennedy. the world will long remember their son edward as the heir to a weighty legacy. a champion for those who had none. the soul of the democratic party and the lion of the united states senate. a man who graces nearly 1,000 laws, who's penned more than 300 laws himself. but those of us who loved him and ache with his passing know ted kennedy by the other titles he held: father, brother, husband, grandfather, uncle teddy, or, as he was often known to his younger nieces and nephews, the grand fromage, or the big cheese. [laughter] i, like so many others in the city where he worked for nearly half a century, knew him as a colleague, a mentor, and, above all, as a friend. ted kennedy was the baby of the family who became its patriarch, the restless dreamer who beca
. >> that's why mom and dad aren't reminding america, hey, little baby, stimulus turns six today. >> angry next door neighbors. >> finally, we always like when athletes or people around sports get involves in politics. mike allen, who is the latest? >> the republicans are discovering that the nfl is a great place to recruit. they feel it helps them with their message of commitment, hard work, valus and so there's now a couple people who are trying to follow in the footsteps. >> did michael vick make an announcement last night? >> no politics in the michael vick interview. he said he found god, which we were happy about. >> he found god and he loves animals, please. who is your pr company? >> you don't like god or animals, mika? >> i just like reality. >> no, you know what, mika grew up in the mean northeast streets of harlem and she's a little more cynical. >> you're talking to a woman who has gutted a deer, okay? >> you know, by the way, they make you do that at madeira before you graduate. >> if you do it, where do you get to go? william. >> is it a problem that they interviewed me and w
stories making news "early today" in america. >>> in south carolina, police dash cam video shows why one officer lost his job. the cop was trailing a group of teens on an atv. when they do pull over, the cop pushes him and hits him multiple times with a flashlight. he was fired after the police chief saw this video. >>> deja vu. this captures the man's 22nd dui violation. the suspect failed his field sobriety test and was later found to have five times the legal alcohol limit. at the time he was pulled over, he had a revoked license and three warrants out for his arrest. >>> florida residents are dealing with an unexpected effect of the depressed economy. this is it. vacant homes serving as prime real estate for massive killer bee colonies. a bee remover found 20,000 bees buzzing on one porch alone. without new homeowners moving in, his winged residents likely will continue to invade houses. >>> a new wax sculpture of the late king of pop was unveiled in los angeles. the $300,000 figure shows michael jackson in wardrobe laid out for the concerts he had planned in london. publicists claim
of the most difficult and dangerous jobs in the country. and that is protecting america is a borders and would you believe it takes 20,000 u.s. border patrol agents to monitor what is coming in and out of the country, every, single day. and obviously, with all of that manpower needed, the department of homeland security is constantly looking for new recruits and more and more of them are coming out of this program, and the learning for life explorer program. sponsored by the boy scouts of america, high school students all around the country get the chance to experience a realistic border patrol training academy. the idea, not only to teach them life skills, but to also get them up close and personal with real life border patrol agents, and the scenarios they encounter. >> they have classes in ethics. officer integrity. morals. officer safety. they also learn how to be part of a team. we do team-building exercises and in the they participate in training classes for specific categories, like what you saw today, marijuana field raid, or a felony hot stop. >> reporter: the roughly 145,000 kids go
, here's a look at some other stories making news "early today" in america. pennsylvania police are searching for a woman who used pepper spray on a clerk when authorities say he tried to stop her from shoplifting. the employee became suspicious after he claimed to see the woman putting dvds into a handbag. when he confronted her, she pulled out a can of mace and sprayed him in the face before running off. >>> when the masked men entered the establishment, it was full of off-duty police officers who were in town for a golf tournament. needless to say, the suspect was quickly tackled and arrested. >>> it was a sticky situation for a woman in phoenix who discovered thousands of bees living under her bathtub. animal experts were called in to remove the hive by cutting a hole in her house. free honey may sound like a sweet opportunity, but officials say in time the bees would have become far more dangerous. >>> and in california, officials are warning some people to stay indoors after a black bear was spotted in a residential neighborhood. the animal estimated at 350 pounds was even
that freedom and choice is what america has thrived on, and spread it around the world. going back to government control and everybody in taking all our money is not going to solve anything. host: caller, it is over to the sentiment by the cia director that it is time to move on to the business of protecting the country and not dwell on the past. caller: absolutely, absolutely. we are in a place where nobody has ever been before, and going back to the past is not going to help. host: thanks for calling. pablo on the line for democrats from brownsville, texas. caller: there are issues that have never even been discussed. host: like what? caller: there is a lot of secrecy and the cia and it goes back to a lot of people in my family who are now gone and not on this earth, but they worked for the defense department. there is something critical here. do we want the truth on everything? we want accountability. accountability to the people, our congress, and to our president. period. it is that simple. god bless you c-span for everything you do for public information and for freedom of sp
the senior citizen population in america. stephen a. smith is in the houston night. the national football league and the philadelphia eagles a have decided to give michael vick a second chance. are you ready to give michael vick a second chance? get your cell phones out right now and text "a" for yes and "b" for no to 622639. we'll have a big discussion on this tonight. all that, and of course the drugster is back in "psycho talk." "daily show" co-creator lizz winstead weighs in on the edwards baby daddy drama. it will be a dandy. >>> first tonight's "op ed." all right, the president. he undoubtedly was the commander in chief on health care today. he went to big sky country, belgra belgrade, montana, and told the truth again. >> this is not some government takeover. if you like your doctor you can keep seeing your doctor. this is important. i don't want government bureaucrats meddling in your health care but i also don't want insurance company bureaucrats meddling in your health care either. >> everybody got that? conservative talkers, you got that? come on. the guy is so clear. the presi
. i don't quite get that but they do. america is a conservative company with a small c in this way. they all say they want change but they don't want quite as much as they think they want when they get in the ballot box. and so you can't change the system and push everybody in a certain way they don't want to go. so in 2004 i said, you know, let's keep the employer-based system is because i think you need to give the american people the choice and if that's what they want, let them choose that. that's why obama's bill -- i'm such a fan of obama's bill. that's howard dean's version of healthcare, 2004. insure everybody under 30. let everybody else buy into medicare or keep their private insurance if you want. now here's what i like obama's bill. it gets back to choice. we have failed to insure people in this country not just because the insurance companies spend a lot of money with harry and lewis who have endorsed health insurance now. we failed because we tried to make the american people do something they didn't want to do. 80% of the people in this country have insurance. of tho
and a half, 2 billion 2:00.5 billion shares a day. same with bank of america. no conversion there but their stock has been terrific. goldman sachs. notice weakness, with other financials strong. maybe they're selling goldman to buy other financials. that's one theory. how about the transports? your other great cyclical group here. you look at the railroads, you look at ryder, you look at anything in this group. continental air did have a secondary and it was weak early on but that stock had big price swings today. it was down around $11. it's moving up here. 2% to 8% gains in all the transports. the transport sector is the leader so far this week. our team is covering the markets right around -- we've got all the bases covered. let's go to my friend mike huckman standing by at the nasdaq first. mike? >> thanks, bob. we are off the very poetic 2,009, 2,010 level we hit. but we're still hanging up around 2,000. we actually still have a few earnings stories to talk about here that are moving a handful of stocks here on the nasdaq and in a big way. for example, graphic chipmaker
as they provide their and set. the supreme court, home to america's highest court. >> private donations? >> grants, and stuff like that. >> donations? >> i do not know. >> federally? >> america's cable companies created a c-span as a public service, a private business initiative. no government mandate. no government money. "washington journal" continues. host: joining us now for a discussion of if anything and everything. ron, and lilnda, she is a political correspondent for the christian science monitor -- that is lilnda. so, the obama family goes off for a week of fun. there will begin to run ads in that local market. would you make of this? guest: it shows two things -- the president never truly goes on vacation. he can put on a good show of being at the beach. he does not have to turn on his tv. he can to net this out. president obama is pretty good at controlling what he pays attention to. he manages his own the time. host: here is this headline that obama tackles the health care reformers. he has been trying to do that all week. how is he doing in this critical area? guest: it shows how far
the kids who heard that radio ad 40 years ago knew what lay ahead. good morning, america, from rock 'n' roll hallowed ground, bethel, new york, the site of woodstock and good morning to my groovy college back in times square, kate snow. >> good morning, peace to you, bill. it is saturday, august 15th. we're also going to have the latest on president obama's trip out west to try to save his health care reform plan. many on both sides of the debate starting to wonder if his agenda is in trouble there. >>> we'll look at the return of football superstar michael vick after 19 months in prison for animal abuse. a lot of questions today about whether he should be allowed to make a comeback. >>> but bill is talking about a very different kind of comeback. the celebration at woodstock. hi, bill >> that's right, the generation that dropped acid now drops antacid but still have the rock 'n' roll peace and love spirit. hard to imagine there were nearly 500,000 of them 40 years ago on this dairy farm in the catskills. so many commemorative battlefields. this is one of those rare monuments devoted t
>>> good morning, america. and this morning, shocking new images of that deadly midair collision over the hudson river as the air traffic controller is suspended for being on the phone right before the crash. >>> a dramatic standoff ends overnight with a man who was making threats against the white house. are new threats over health care part of a troubling trend? >>> california ablaze. thousands evacuated as raging wildfires burn out of control. >>> kelly clarkson says she has no problem with her weight. so why is she suddenly thinner on a magazine cover than she is in real life? what's behind these photo fixes? ♪ smile it's a kiss >> and kenny chesney rocks central park as our summer >> and kenny chesney rocks central park as our summer concert series goes country. captions paid for by abc, inc. >>> kenny is one of our favorites. looking forward to having him. good morning, everyone, alongside "gma weekend" co-anchor good to have bill weir with us. i'm robin roberts on this friday, august 14th. diane wrapping up some vacation time. >> great to see you. >>> breaking news point
. huh. the new lightweight hp mini netbook with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. >>> welcome back to the most news in the morning. 26 minutes of a the hour. it's a long way from mexico but coastal maine, believe it or not, has become an emerging market for mexican drug cartels. >> the drug in demand, not marijuana, cocaine but heroin, a story you'll see only on american morning. >> reporter: when you think of the war on drugs you think inner cities, new york, chicago, l.a., d.c., but coastal maine? you may be surprised to hear heroin has become a huge problem too big to contain. lighthouse, lobsters. >> heroin, more heroin. >> and heroin? >> it's scary. >> thousands of miles from the drug cartels of mexico, this bucolic place in a mecca for heroin use. this detective has been working for decades. he says he's seen it all but never this. >> my case load for heroin has tripled over the last three years. >> that's incredible. >> yeah, i
invasion and conquest of america." good to see you both this morning. >> morning, carlos. >> bob, who did i elicit a laugh from? from pat or bob? >> you know, it's sort of a predictable title for one of pat's books, but it will probably sell a lot of books on the right and help the republican party to permanent minority status. >> i've written two books since then, bob, and that was about the immigration debate which as you recall we won pretty well. >> oh, yeah, you really won. you managed to drive that hispanic vote for the republican presidential candidate down from 44% to 35%. and republicans can't win without 40% of the hispanic vote. >> we're doing just fine right now. i notice obama's in strategic retreat, bob. >> actually, you know what? you guys have brought this to the perfect place. i didn't even need to set this up. hey, bob, i'm going to go to you first. is pat right, is the president in strategic retreat at this point midway through the august recess, and if not, what in your mind does he need to do in order to ultimately get meaningful health care reform done? >> i think he's
humanity and asserted their rights. >> we're continuing our discussion tonight on america's issues on race. one red-hot controversial issue in particular is the sometimes strained relationship between african americans and the police. warren valentine is the host of "the warren valentine show," and he's also a former prosecutor. he's joining us live. he's in atlanta. thank you very much. you're usually by satellite. good to see you. >> good to see you, don. >> we have been discussing one of the comments i have been hearing from african americans that african-americans are too sensitive on racial matters but it's not always matters of race. >> it's not. the situation in boston with sergeant crowley, i was one of the main people saying look, this is not racial profiling taking place. i said it on my national show and my local show in chicago. however, one of the things that's not being discussed here is what happened, and this is what is going on in black america. have you 2 million people incarcerated in this country. 1 million are black. when you look at officer crowley falsifying a police
town halls into chaos. today, the white house fights to regain control. >>> is america off course in afghanistan? the top u.s. commander says the taliban now actually holds the upper hand while the jury is still out on whether the president's revamped strategy is taking hold. >>> nobel prize winning economist declares the world has aremembered averted a great second depression. is the government the solution? we have a terrific lineup this hour. democratic congressman and senate challenger joe sestak stops by and u.s. news and world reporter peter roth and ryan ellis and tim martin and del castilla will be with us. chuck todd is at the white house in addition and richard engel will report live from us from afghanistan. >>> recovery crews resumed operations this morning following tragic mid air collision over the hudson river. nine people were killed in the disaster involving a private plane and tourist helicopter. >>> predawn bombings in iraq killed 40 people. the blast are the latest major round of attack since u.s. forces withdrew from iraq's urban areas in june. >>> pennsylvani
of less. [ horn honks ] new charmin ultra soft. america's softest bath tissue. and you know what, it works. nutrisystem for men: flexible new programs personalized to meet your goals. what's great about nutrisystem is you eat the foods you love and you lose weight. i'm dan marino. i lost 22 pounds on nutrisystem and i've kept it off for three years. for a limited time, get an extra three weeks of meals free! that's right, you can get an extra 21 breakfasts, lunches, dinners, desserts, and acks. that's 105 meals free! i had awesome results. i mean, i lost 22 pounds, my goal was 20, it came off fast, and the food was great. it's what every guy's been waiting for: it's healthy weight loss and it's flexible. with prices as low as $12 a day, you'll save hundreds over other weight-loss programs. order now and get an era three weeks of fantastic meals. that's right, 105 meals absolutely free. call or click now. guys, you can do this. >>> the woman with the automatic weapon knew that was a fema concentration camp because she saw it on glenn beck. first on this date in 1940 was born in dayton, ohio
in america, and freedom of speech means to express yourselves, but if somebody else wants to express themselves, to have quiet and decorum and civility so we can exchange ideas. there are a great many subjects of importance in washington today. we're working very hard on global warming, the president has put immigration on the agenda for later this year, we are working on judicial nominations and confirmation of supreme court justice sotomayor. we are working hard on the issue of economic recovery, and there are already some positive signs. but it is too early with less than six months on a two-year program to really know. the preliminary indications are positive. but they are tentative. it is understandable that there is a lot of concern in america about what is happening in our country because of the loss of more than 4 million jobs. people are losing their health insurance. there is uncertainty of the future, concern about the large deficit, concern about the large national debt. after being in touch with 12 million people in pennsylvania for meetings, calls, letters, there is a l
that celebrates black america. they are seeing the signature, yes, of abraham lincoln. many artifacts are being used as a hands on educational tool. it's the chevy open house. and now, with the cash for clunkers program, a great deal gets even better. let us recycle your older vehicle and you could qualify for an additional $3500 or $4500 cash back on a new, more fuel-efficient chevy. your chevy dealer has more eligible models to choose from. more than ford, toyota, or honda. now get an '09 cobalt for under $15,000 after all offers. and get it for even less if you qualify for cash for clunkers program. go to chevy.com for details. my name is chef michael. and when i come home from my restaurant, i love showing bailey how special she is. yes, you are. i know exactly what you love, don't i? - [ barks ] - mmm. aromas like rotisserie chicken. and filet mignon. yeah, that's what inspired a very special dry dog food. [ woman ] introducing chef michael's canine creations. so tasty and nutritious it's hard to believe it's dry dog food. chef-inspired. dog-desired.@i chef michael's canine creations. morn
the change from bank of america rounds up every debit card purchase to the next dollar and transfers the difference from your checking to savings account. it's one of the many ways we make saving money in tough times a whole lot easier. you could buy 300 bottles of water. or just one brita filter. ( drop plinks ) brita-- better for the environment and your wallet. >>> all right. so it is a make or break month for health care reform. and now the fight is out of washington and in your backyard. lawmakers are holding town hall meetings in their districts, but some, mostly democrats, can barely get a word out. >> come on. >> i'll tell you about conspiracy. it reads like something that was thought up in the early 1930s in germany. >> wow. can you hear the passion there? it was a packed meeting for iowa democratic senator tom harkin yesterday. reform opponents weren't the only ones in the crowd, but they may have been the loudest. harkin repeated the democrats' line that these disruptions are a coordinated effort by reform opponents. conservatives have encouraged people to come out. the re
of the real discussion that america deserves. >> our senior white house correspondent, ed henry, is traveling with the president. first montana, later today, colorado. why these locations specifically? >> reporter: partially because these are not necessarily democratic areas friendly. president made a point to come to montana, colorado, in the mountain west. the democratic presidential candidates had abandoned thinking they couldn't win in previous elections. he won some of them. he is trying to translate the health reform debate. when you talk to a white house debate, you say, look, he can have a reasoned debate with people that don't agree with him. he is showing a counterweight with the other town hall meetings. trying to turn the temperature down on things, saying, look, we can have a reason to face a civil debate. he had one here in montana yesterday at the town hall. only one sharp exchange, one or two. one that got a lot of attention, a man pretty blunt, plain spoken, saying all i'm getting from you and democrats is bull. the president repeated his campaign pledge and said, we will hav
care, just saying there's a high level of anger because federal government is seen in middle america as going way over in the last six months and it's going to be a long august. >> we need to point out that particular clip played, that was philadelphia. >> that's not philadelphia, mississippi. it's a very blue city in a very blue state. >> joe, look, i think there's really something out there. i was talking to my sister. she said this weekend there was some 7,000 or 10,000 out in columbus, ohio in the square. you've got the tea party groups. you've got the groups concerned about the jobs. you've got the health care thing, the birther things. i think this is all -- i think this thing is reaching a certain critical mass of populist hostility and resentment to washington. i don't think it's pro republican or pro democratic, but a lot of this tea party stuff -- it's like the perot movement i think in the early 1990s. >> like the perot movement in '92, also like what i saw on the campaign trail in '93 and '94, there are a lot of democrats and a lot of independents who got out who just cou
the war in 2002 and 2003. bob novak hated america, hated their president and were rooting for america to lose the war. that was coming from bush's closest allies. so i've got to say to bob novak, good job. if you've got the far left after you and far right after you. he did also in the 1990s. republican leadership hated novak because he went after everybody. that's actually -- that's what a journalist is supposed to do. >> yes, it absolutely is. we'll be talking more about bob novak throughout the show and remembering him. >> that's the news at this point. we should check on weather. hurricane bill -- >> by the way, really quickly, for all of you about to write an e-mail. >> no. >> no. hold on. it's okay. how deare bob novak release the name of valerie plame, he hates america, if you could just attach an an e-mail you sent in when the "washington post" released the name of cia programs across the globe that actually endangered american lives, then we'll be more willing to read your e-mail, but, please, just save it because you're a hypocrite. we really don't want to hear from you this
is hosted by the lobbying group techamerica. >> so to that end i just wanted to introduce phil bond as he puts on his moo cophone. -- microphone. he's president of techamerica, and he has a few opening remarks to say what we're looking forward to in the fall. and then we have a number of our policy experts on hand and on the phone as well to facilitate what we hope will be a good, fruitful q&a session for all of you. >> thank you very much. can you pick it up? bear with me, everybody, for one minute here. i'm tech technologically challed by a lapel mic. there we go. welcome, everybody, glad you could join us. we are the largest advocate si group on behalf of the technology industry with 1500-member countries and touch some 16,000 technology companies. and on behalf of all of them, i welcome you here. we have some of our key staff with us today to help us field some of your questions. after i do a quick review kind of the water front of some of the issues still in the policy lean ma on behalf -- arena on behalf of the tech sector. let me introduce those folks in advance so you'll know who
netbook with windows and america's largest and most-reliable 3g network built in. only 199.99 with mobile broadband plans from 39.99 i am-- speechless, envious. wanna be me right now. getting one. your home or business - the next generation of brink's home security. call now. >> welcome back to "fox & friends" on this sunday morning, now i'm mike jerrick in for dave. the news in the news. $500,000, that's how much the pair yell spot next to marilyn monroe is auctioned off for ebay. the woman who owns the crypt is selling it in hopes of getting enough money to pay off the mortgage on her beverly hills estate. next, 7.25 million dollars, that's how much was paid for a 1955 shelby daytona cobra coupe. the highest amount ever paid for an american car at auction. and finally, 1224, how much this record setting cupcake weighs. the detroit bakery attempted a 7,000 pound cupcake, didn't work out, but they did it, they did it this time and it worked out and it's a world record cupcake weight. >> delicious. >> tasty. >> send that to us. could the democrat's health care plan use federal funds for a
of people being negative on the left and on the right and everybody saying this is the end of america as we know it. you're -- i home hopeful. you're hopeful, too. you think this reset, this fundamental reset is great for america in the long run. >> i do. it's happened before many times and taking a bit of the long view, not discounting the real pain that people feel when the moments happen and they're out of jobs but, yeah. i think it is time after a very long run in one direction to sort of sit down and get a little sane. >> a year ago i was complaining every day about the fact that we as a country had a 0% savings rate. or germany. germany had a 10% savings rate. did they -- while i was -- >> not yet. >> still wasn't. >> yeah. >> all right. i was hoping it would have kateri katerina vitt on our side. we're up to like 7%. we are healing ourselves. like you said, a lot of people in pain but in the long run may be a great, fundamental reset for america. >> the idea that you just can't have it all for nothing, that there is finally no such thing as a free lunch is a good thing to be whacked
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 221 (some duplicates have been removed)

Terms of Use (10 Mar 2001)